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African American History

1.  In 2002 the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission co-sponsored a survey with the North Carolina Historic Preservation Office of properties associated with the African American experience in Mecklenburg County.

To read the contextual essay, click here  - Survey Of African American Historic Sites

To view the African American properties identified during the course of this survey, click here - List Of African Sites American Eligible For The National Register

To read an essay on the different building types identified in the survey, click here - List Of African American Building Types

2.  No subject is more disturbing that the existence of slavery in our community.  Click here to read a brief history of slavery in Mecklenburg County

    a.  Click here to read documents about local slavery

    b.  Click here to read additional documents on local slavery

3.  In the 1890s and opening years of the twentieth century African Americans became racially segregated by law and virtually disenfranchised.  Click here to read about the coming of legal racial segregation to Mecklenburg County

     a.  Click here to read documents on local events during Reconstructon

4.  The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s brought legal racial segregation to an end in Mecklenburg County.  Click here to read about the Civil Rights Movement in Mecklenburg County

5.  Photographs are a compelling reminder of our past.  Click here to see photographs of the Rattley Family.

6.  African American farmers lived in Mecklenburg County.  Click here to read about an African American Farmer And His Wife.

7.  Storytelling was prevalent in the years when slavery existed in Mecklenburg County.  Click here to read a story told by a slave.

8.  There are sites associated with African American history throughout Mecklenburg County .  Click here to view an African American Heritage Tour.

9.  The following photo gallery contains images of African Americans in Charlotte Mecklenburg.  Click here to view Photo Gallery.

10.  Churches were central to sustaining African American Culture.

     a.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on Grace A.M.E. Zion Church.

     b.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on Little Rock A.M.E. Zion Church.

     c.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on Lloyd Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

     d.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on First United Presbyterian Church.

     e.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on the Matthews Murkland Presbyterian Church (destroyed).

11.  Legal racial segregation gave rise to a built environment that served only African Americans.

     a.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on the Good Samaritan Hospital (destroyed).

     b.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on the Grand Theater.

12.  Rosenwald Schools were an essential component of public education for African American children in Mecklenburg County.

     a.  Click here to read the Survey and Research Report on the McClintock and Newell Rosenwald Schools.